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Do you think you can deal with bipolar disorder alone? Do you think you can keep your bipolar a secret and just do what it requires by yourself? If so, you're not alone. Many people try, sometimes for years, to handle bipolar disorder alone. They do Google searches and online research about bipolar and its treatments and somehow that makes people think they can do it on their own. But I have news for you: you can't deal with bipolar disorder alone.
Exercise can be a great way to let go of negative emotions and manage your self-harm urges. In particular, using yoga for self-harm prevention is beneficial as it teaches you to connect with your body and physically accept it with all its imperfections. 
Making healthy boundaries with a mentally ill family member is a key step for your self-care as a supporter. Read on to learn more about the kinds of boundaries I have with my brother, who has chronic depression and anxiety.
How often do you think of anxiety as your friend? This may sound like a strange question, but I believe the way we relate to anxiety plays a significant role in how we experience it. Cultivating a positive relationship with anxiety can be an important part of recovery, but it's also really difficult to do.
An estimated 9.2 million adults in the U.S. live with more than one form of mental illness, and that statistic does not even count the numerous children and people across the globe who experience this reality also. Two mental health issues that can co-exist with one another are eating disorders and panic attacks, both of which can escape detection or diagnosis. While panic attacks can range in severity and escalate for a number of different reasons, many of the same fears that cause eating disorder behaviors can contribute to panic attacks as well. If your eating disorder often co-exists with panic attacks, coping mechanisms are available to you.
If you live with anxiety, chances are you look for problems. Don't get me wrong. You're most definitely not doing it on purpose. All humans have a built-in negativity bias that causes us to be on alert for danger so we can take action to protect ourselves. Anxiety, in its misguided attempt to keep us safe, usurps that negativity bias and magnifies it, causing us to operate under the assumption that there are problems everywhere.
Here is an unpopular opinion: not everyone can turn their passion into a career and that's okay. In fact, not everyone should even try to do that in the first place. But here's the thing: doing meaningful work is indispensable if one wants to keep depression at bay. Even though you are not your job, the work you do does impact the quality of your life. When you do work that matters to you, life with depression becomes easier. This is a personal observation. When I was training to be a software tester, I was miserable. And when I became a writer, I finally felt a sense of satisfaction.
Have you ever wondered about the mental health benefits of the yoga philosophy? I always felt emotionally refreshed after a yoga class and recently I began yoga teacher training. I've been so fascinated by everything I am learning about the philosophy of yoga. Read on if you, too, are interested in understanding how yoga philosophy can improve your mental health.
When life overwhelms you and you have trouble keeping it together, understanding your why will help you get past the tough times and keep your self-esteem strong. If you have a good reason to keep on keeping on, it makes it easier to persevere through whatever you face. But, what makes a reason good? Understanding this point is key in your effort to build healthy self-esteem.
Health anxiety used to be called hypochondria, and it's a highly stigmatized mental health condition. Instead of being taken seriously, health anxiety is often reduced to being "dramatic." I have dealt with health anxiety on and off for the last seven years, and I want to share my experience so others won't have to feel as alone as I have. 

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Comments

Zaylin
I have a little, i am in highschool, how do i keep her from coming out in a lesson? im not sure how to communicate with her i have no idea how old she might be, and i have another alter who tries to front, but does no work, and doesnt really care. i dont know if i should give her toys and bring them to school? i dont want her getting lost and i dont want the body to start acting like a child.
Jennifer Lear
Hello, Lizanne! Thank you so much for your lovely comment and your warm welcome! You're absolutely right- we really do need more people to come forward and share their stories, and I love the way you put it - "so that it can light the way for others." Thank you so much for your support, and I hope you have a wonderful week!

Tasha
Oh lord that’s me...2 years after making a mistake that hurt someone’s feelings (as a result of trauma inflicted on me by someone else), I cannot forgive myself though they have forgiven me. I am suicidal almost every day in spite of therapy, medication, etc. Hopefully, this will change some day.
Sarah Sharp
Hi, Lizanne!

Thank you so much for reaching out. I'm really excited to be a part of what we're doing at HealthyPlace, and I hope I can help some people. Please let me know if there's anything you'd like to read on "Life with Bob."

Kind regards,

Sarah Sharp
Martha Lueck
Hi Maureen,

I am very sorry that you have struggled so much. You are a very strong person to have endured all that. Can you think of any specific piece of advice or affirmation that a counselor has given you? Is there a support group in your area for people who struggle with grief, disabilities, or mood disorders?

At this time, there is a lot of online support. One app I use that is very helpful is called Wisdo. You can connect with people who have been through many difficult situations. The best part is, you can stay anonymous. So it is completely safe. I know that virtual communication does not replace the value of face-to-face conversations, but apps and the internet can be useful for convenience.

I don't know if any of those ideas will work for you, but I want you to know that you are a resilient person worthy of love and care. Thank you for reaching out on here.

Here are some links that I would recommend visiting.
-https://venturebeat.com/2018/12/13/wisdo-launches-chat-app-to-discuss-illnesses-job-losses-and-other-challenges-out-of-beta/
-https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/mental-illness-overview/how-to-find-mental-health-services-in-your-area

I wish you the best of luck!

-Martha Lueck