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Have you ever noticed that movement, whether through running, walking, or yoga, reduces your anxiety? Exercise is known to improve our health, but I've benefitted immensely, particularly from yoga in times of stress. For me, yoga is the perfect synthesis of meditation and exercise.
Do you procrastinate? If so, how's your anxiety? Many people are surprised to learn that procrastination and anxiety are often closely linked. Procrastination can be a defense mechanism to gain temporary relief from anxiety as you avoid anxiety-provoking tasks. Unfortunately, procrastinating can ultimately increase anxiety because of the added pressure and stress it adds to your already busy life. When you know more about what links these two cruel partners, you can recognize them as they occur and then take measures to stop procrastinating and reduce anxiety.
I know it's okay to take a mental health day during a pandemic because yesterday afternoon, I unraveled. I couldn't move, I couldn't eat, all I could do was crawl in bed and breathe. And that's how I spent the rest of the day.
After being diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), I went through several stages before coming to full acceptance of the disorder. I don't know what it is about life after an official diagnosis, but I experienced everything from liberating aha moments to depression and despair.  Everyone processes their emotions differently post-diagnosis—so I thought it would be helpful to share my timeline for those who've been recently diagnosed and/or struggling.  The stages are listed in the order they were experienced.
Can I share a fundamental, irrevocable truth that you just might need to hear? Your personal identity is more than an eating disorder. Even if you cannot imagine a life without this illness right now, I want you to know that recovery is attainable, and you are capable of existing in a world that does not revolve around your eating disorder. How can I voice this with absolute confidence? The answer is simple—in these past few years, I have been on a crusade to unearth and reclaim my own identity outside the diagnosis of anorexia nervosa; so if I can do this, I guarantee you have the same potential, too.
When you live in the present and focus on the now, your self-esteem will grow. Poor self-esteem is often accompanied by worrying about the future or getting stuck in regrets of the past. I want to share how I learned to practice this skill. Living in the present can be challenging at first, but you will find it worth the effort as your self-esteem grows.
I joined HealthyPlace a year ago as a way to better understand my posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis. Writing about the impact PTSD has had on my life has been therapeutic, and I've learned a lot about myself in the process. I've also found great comfort in the online mental health community HealthyPlace has provided. However, it is time for me to move onto new adventures and say goodbye to HealthyPlace.
Having community support when living with dissociative identity disorder (DID) is an important part of dealing with the disorder. Dissociative identity disorder can feel like a burden in more ways than one. In addition to dealing with the multiple conversations happening in your mind, you need to maintain your “outer shell,” or the parts that other people interact with the most. What do you do when the people around you are unaware of your condition?
Trying to stop binge eating at night isn't solely a matter of willpower -- especially when you've suffered or are suffering from an eating disorder. I know firsthand how distressing this behavior can be for those of us who are struggling to take control back from this food-centric disease, but the tips I am about to share can help.
When I first read online that once I started really digging in to my recovery, things would get worse before they got better, I thought I understood. I thought it meant that acknowledging my pain would cause me more pain at first, but then it would heal and I would be "better." I knew that was a naive way of looking at things, but I still believed that would generally be the process. Boy, was I wrong.

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Comments

Zaylin
I have a little, i am in highschool, how do i keep her from coming out in a lesson? im not sure how to communicate with her i have no idea how old she might be, and i have another alter who tries to front, but does no work, and doesnt really care. i dont know if i should give her toys and bring them to school? i dont want her getting lost and i dont want the body to start acting like a child.
Jennifer Lear
Hello, Lizanne! Thank you so much for your lovely comment and your warm welcome! You're absolutely right- we really do need more people to come forward and share their stories, and I love the way you put it - "so that it can light the way for others." Thank you so much for your support, and I hope you have a wonderful week!

Tasha
Oh lord that’s me...2 years after making a mistake that hurt someone’s feelings (as a result of trauma inflicted on me by someone else), I cannot forgive myself though they have forgiven me. I am suicidal almost every day in spite of therapy, medication, etc. Hopefully, this will change some day.
Sarah Sharp
Hi, Lizanne!

Thank you so much for reaching out. I'm really excited to be a part of what we're doing at HealthyPlace, and I hope I can help some people. Please let me know if there's anything you'd like to read on "Life with Bob."

Kind regards,

Sarah Sharp
Martha Lueck
Hi Maureen,

I am very sorry that you have struggled so much. You are a very strong person to have endured all that. Can you think of any specific piece of advice or affirmation that a counselor has given you? Is there a support group in your area for people who struggle with grief, disabilities, or mood disorders?

At this time, there is a lot of online support. One app I use that is very helpful is called Wisdo. You can connect with people who have been through many difficult situations. The best part is, you can stay anonymous. So it is completely safe. I know that virtual communication does not replace the value of face-to-face conversations, but apps and the internet can be useful for convenience.

I don't know if any of those ideas will work for you, but I want you to know that you are a resilient person worthy of love and care. Thank you for reaching out on here.

Here are some links that I would recommend visiting.
-https://venturebeat.com/2018/12/13/wisdo-launches-chat-app-to-discuss-illnesses-job-losses-and-other-challenges-out-of-beta/
-https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/mental-illness-overview/how-to-find-mental-health-services-in-your-area

I wish you the best of luck!

-Martha Lueck