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At a time when the outside world feels chaotic, I've found myself turning inward as much as possible by using visualization to feel better. It's one of my favorite ways to block out circumstances and events that aren't within my control by visualizing things that make me feel happy.
As someone who has not only personally experienced addiction recovery but has also worked as an addiction professional, I know all about the idolization of the sacred sobriety date. However, if you've followed this blog for long, you've probably noticed that I've never given my exact sobriety date or the precise weeks, months, or days I've been free from my addiction. This is because I really don't honor the sacred sobriety date like so many others do in addiction recovery. I have no ill will towards those who do participate in this ritual, but I've learned over time that it just isn't my thing.
Self-injury, by its very nature, seems inherently connected to suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Yet while suicide necessarily involves causing yourself harm, there is a subtle but important difference between self-harm vs. self-destruction.
Although I am now less afraid to drive, in the past, my schizoaffective anxiety has made me afraid to do it. But it’s getting better, largely due to the fact that I got a Subaru. My mom was due for a new Subaru, so she gave me her old one. It’s a sports utility vehicle (SUV) with four-wheel drive and all sorts of safety features, and I’ve been driving more since it’s been my car.
To begin with an understatement, let's say that anxiety is frustrating and anxious thoughts disrupt inner tranquility. An equal understatement is that we don't have to give into anxiety and remain trapped. There are so many ways to beat anxiety, and there are strategies and tools for every personality and unique individual who experiences their own version of anxiety. An important part of gaining freedom from anxiety (which means both reducing anxiety symptoms and living well in spite of lingering symptoms) is knowing when to act on anxiety and anxious thoughts and when to be still.
September 10th is World Suicide Prevention day. No better time to shine a light on the high rates of suicide completion and suicide attempts that are present here in our gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, etc. (LGBTQIA+) community. Trigger warning: this post involves frank discussion of suicide and a suicide attempt.
I’m Court Rundell and I’m thrilled to co-author the Recovering from Mental Illness blog at HealthyPlace. From a very early age, I was painfully aware that my internal life was atypical, and I needed to keep it a secret. I had panic attacks and disassociated from my body regularly by seven; I attempted suicide at 11 and started abusing drugs and alcohol by 12.
If you reframe your thoughts, you develop healthy self-esteem because self-esteem is all about the way you look at yourself. So, one of the best tools to practice in this journey is the ability to reframe a negative thought into a positive. one Learning to change your point of view is key in your effort to build strong self-esteem.
Limitations in mental health recovery are real; but lately, I've been doing everything in my power to ignore my increasingly obvious limitations. I just don't want to be mentally ill anymore. I want it to go away so I can read and write and be a good wife and mother without a herculean effort. Even though I've been in recovery for years now, part of me still believes that if I just ignore my limitations and shame myself for having them in the first place, I'll be able to just breeze past them. Every time, this leads to a complete meltdown that forces me to honor my limitations, so you'd think I would know better by now, but here I am again, in meltdown mode.
My name is Meagon Nolasco and I couldn’t be happier to join the HealthyPlace team here at The Life: LGBT Mental Health blog. I identify as a cis-gendered, (woman born a female) lesbian, woman and have been out in our community for just over a decade now. My extensive history with mental health is just as defining to me as my identity and lifestyle.

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Comments

Zaylin
I have a little, i am in highschool, how do i keep her from coming out in a lesson? im not sure how to communicate with her i have no idea how old she might be, and i have another alter who tries to front, but does no work, and doesnt really care. i dont know if i should give her toys and bring them to school? i dont want her getting lost and i dont want the body to start acting like a child.
Jennifer Lear
Hello, Lizanne! Thank you so much for your lovely comment and your warm welcome! You're absolutely right- we really do need more people to come forward and share their stories, and I love the way you put it - "so that it can light the way for others." Thank you so much for your support, and I hope you have a wonderful week!

Tasha
Oh lord that’s me...2 years after making a mistake that hurt someone’s feelings (as a result of trauma inflicted on me by someone else), I cannot forgive myself though they have forgiven me. I am suicidal almost every day in spite of therapy, medication, etc. Hopefully, this will change some day.
Sarah Sharp
Hi, Lizanne!

Thank you so much for reaching out. I'm really excited to be a part of what we're doing at HealthyPlace, and I hope I can help some people. Please let me know if there's anything you'd like to read on "Life with Bob."

Kind regards,

Sarah Sharp
Martha Lueck
Hi Maureen,

I am very sorry that you have struggled so much. You are a very strong person to have endured all that. Can you think of any specific piece of advice or affirmation that a counselor has given you? Is there a support group in your area for people who struggle with grief, disabilities, or mood disorders?

At this time, there is a lot of online support. One app I use that is very helpful is called Wisdo. You can connect with people who have been through many difficult situations. The best part is, you can stay anonymous. So it is completely safe. I know that virtual communication does not replace the value of face-to-face conversations, but apps and the internet can be useful for convenience.

I don't know if any of those ideas will work for you, but I want you to know that you are a resilient person worthy of love and care. Thank you for reaching out on here.

Here are some links that I would recommend visiting.
-https://venturebeat.com/2018/12/13/wisdo-launches-chat-app-to-discuss-illnesses-job-losses-and-other-challenges-out-of-beta/
-https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/mental-illness-overview/how-to-find-mental-health-services-in-your-area

I wish you the best of luck!

-Martha Lueck